slow worm mistaken as snakeSlow-worms are a type of legless lizard and are often mistaken for snakes.  Unlike snakes they can blink, have a flat forked tongue and can drop their tails if attacked.  Slow-worms are widespread throughout Britain but are absent from Ireland.

Identification Adults up to 50 cm in length.  Shiny, smooth skin.  Males: usually greyor brown in colour.  May have bright blue spots.  Females: usually golden brown on top and darker on sides and belly.  Often have a dark stripe running along back.  Juveniles: black or dark brown belly. Gold, silver or coppefrontier slow worm 2r sides.  Often have a dark stripe running along back.  Visible eyelid.May be confused with snakes: unlike snakes they can blink, have a flat forked tongue and can drop their tails if attackedDistributionNative to the UK.  Widespread across the UK but absent from Ireland.  Wide distribution across continental Europe.EcologySpecies of legless lizard but often mistaken for snakes.  Feed on variety of invertebrates including slugs, snails and other garden pests.  Found under stones, wood, sheets of metal, and in compost heaps.Predators and other threatsAdults eaten by snakes, hedgehogs, foxes and birds.  Threatened by loss and degradation of habitat.

A year in the life…Spring

Adults emerge from their hibernation sites in spring; breeding takes place during April and May.  Slow-worms do not tend to bask out in the open like other reptiles, instead preferring to hide under objects that will be warmed by the sun or will create their own warmth such as compost heaps or dead wood.

Summer

Female slow-worms incubate their eggs internally and ‘give birth’ to live young in latebaby worm summer.  The gold or silver juveniles are very thin and only around 4cm long.

Autumn

Slow-worms spend autumn preparing for hibernation.  Adults usually feed on slow moving prey like slugs.

Winter

Slow-worms usually hibernate between November and March.

Credit to www.froglife.org

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